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Posts Tagged ‘public relations strategy

Social Media: A universe expanding at an incredible rate

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superva

The more researchers study the social media space, the more value and productivity they find. Social media, enterprise media, hangs like the baby in Kubrick’s famous movie.

What does that baby represent?

A nascent technology evolving into something like a new consciousness. A metaphor for what we are becoming: SocialMind.

The collaborative expansion of knowledge-sharing for those who search becomes the competitive advantage of those who find. Creation is cosmology.

The cosmology of social media. The context of enterprise media.

Just as a focus on searching our galaxy and universe are uncovering astronomical and astrophysical discoveries day after day, so, too, are researchers finding a cosmology of the new enterprise. We are continuously looking for ways to leverage competitive advantage through new tools creating new holes in the fabric of old enterprise.

Theoretical physics in the shape of Higgs-boson, has shown us that we may exist in a multiverse. Our universe may be getting smaller as our knowledge goes beyond our stars.

The astronomy of the social media value add

McKinsey Global Institute’s research shows social media could unleash “value and productivity” through communication and collaboration that could add $1.3 trillion to the economy.

Most of this value would come through productivity:

  • 98 per cent of the value add would come through the professional services companies sector

Social media universe? Multiverse? Consider what companies like Oracle, Salesforce.com and Microsoft are doing:

  • Salesforce.com bought GoInstant and Buddy Media

Short-term damage done and enormous opportunity

These purchases indicate where enterprise companies are going. The Facebook IPO damaged the reputation of social media, but that’s in the short-term.

Why?

Because interactions workers have the highest spread of profits per employee. Because what companies saw as their business before the explosion of social technologies, is not what they see as their business now.

Not alone.

Evolving through holes in space:

Breaking through to the new business model

Companies are lookng through holes in space. They are looking to evolve. Disruptive technologies create as part of their process.

Organizations are going through wormholes. They are seeing other worlds. Their visions and strategies continue to develop as they embrace enterprise media to travel beyond their old business models.

Ask yourself:

Where do breakthroughs come from?

The companies mentioned above aren’t in the habit of following. They are leaders. Leaders in enterprise.

The future is social. The future is perpetual change.

In industries like banking, this will be huge. Make your most important capital, your people, more effective, and you will dramatically increase the profit spread per employee. Connected by the potential in social technologies, we communicate, we collaborate, we create our cosmologies of knowledge.

Nielsen recently found total time spent on social media (U.S., PCs and mobile) increased 37% to 121 billion minutes.

Nielsocmin

To touch the face of your audience

Banking and financial services clearly demonstrate the need for tools that can reach out and engage consumers with great immediacy. The financial crisis, multiple scandals including LIBOR, are all examples of ongoing media stories compounding the reputational damage to an industry full of hard-working, honest people.

With the financial crisis, we have seen the greatest business upheaval in most of our lifetimes. The need to reach out and engage with publics to restore trust is not an option. The bold step is a necessity.

Shock wave and rebirth

The reputational damage left after the financial crisis is a star going supernova, still spreading its shock wave. But supernovae created the building blocks of life.

Reaching out, engaging, informing publics that have been burned by an exploding star, and listening to them, is crucial.

Missing the potential in these channels will separate the forward-looking from the fearful. And more channels will be born.

Social media in the context of enterprise media is spreading its influence. It’s an explosion of tweets blasting through our collective consciousness. We are going beyond where we’ve gone before.

I am become social, the creator of worlds

We are the SocialMind

Organizations are touching the faces of audiences through ideas and channels that were once just concepts. Companies are communicating with their audiences as they exist in their own times and spaces through a cloud interface.

Through social technologies, we have become something different. We are the SocialMind.

We are the creators of worlds.

What kind of worlds will we create?

Our starships are enterprise media travelling at the speed of light within and without organizational planets and galaxies.

We are going beyond where we have gone before …

And we are all made of stars.

stars

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The social multiverse at work?

A friend of mine sent me the following, startled at how similar the beginning of it was to my pieces on the social multiverse. Interesting …

How Twitter Is Reshaping The Future Of Storytelling http://www.fastcoexist.com

Update: Here’s a great infographic on Social Media ROI.

Infographic: The ROI of Social Media
Infographic by MDG Advertising

Coming soon:

Universes. Multiverses. Messages. Creating social cosmologies.

More on social media? Find it here:
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Reputation. Reputation. Reputation. Your key differentiator: Corporate Social Responsibility

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Stand out by being a CSR thought leader

“In the business world, the rear view mirror is always clearer than the windshield.” — Warren Buffett

reputation

A study by Adam Friedman Associates continues to confirm the importance of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). CSR’s becoming a harder asset.

Executives from Fortune 1000 organizations said that the C-suite and/or board of directors involve themselves directly in “decision-making and measurement processes with regards to the company’s CSR programs.” There’s lots of talk about being different but when it comes to CSR and “getting it”, decision-makers at the forefront of thought leadership understand that CSR is a key differentiator.

Be different. Be better.

Who are you? What do you stand for? Where are you going?

Competition is fierce. Tools that define who you are and what you stand for as an organization show a company to be forward-thinking with a strategy that reaches beyond the latest quarter and far into the future.

The C-suite’s talking about CSR. Executives are more and more conscious of how CSR contributes to business.

CSR: Growing. Growing. Grown.

Results of the study show:

[T]here has been an expansion in scope and focus of CSR strategies and resource allocation. Many CSR initiatives were created in response to environmental issues and pressures, but companies are now expanding their focus to social, health, diversity, labor and safety issues. While many companies still focus much of their time and resources on environmental issues, CSR has grown to include almost any issue or concern that affects the operations and reputation of the company.

So, CSR is growing its influence.

More measurement. More third parties.

Measurement’s still not universal. But there are more third parties involved and more supplier audits. Of course, reception of programs by consumers and media are important and impact evaluation.

Transparency and volume of information have made consumer opinions more important than ever.

CSR and profitability are clearly linked for many corporations. Today’s thought leaders no longer see CSR “as a ‘soft’ discipline within the corporate structure”.

CSR directly affects profitability.

Integrate. Maximize. Get results.

Still think social media is a digital smoke screen?

The study found:

Social media has become an important tool companies use to communicate to their publics about their CSR efforts in addition to traditional media. This allows companies to communicate their CSR activities and progress in a manner that is fast, easily accessible and provides them with vital feedback from their publics.

Companies are using social media to supply their stakeholders with information and content. They are building online communities.

Companies are using social media to find out what their stakeholders care about. They’re using incoming messages to help craft future social media strategies.

Thinking strategically, companies have embedded CSR communications deep into their overall communication strategies. Employees are using social media to measure the effectiveness of CSR.

Everything that makes CSR disappear, makes CSR stronger:

In integration, find strength

Some executives believe:

[T]he CSR function may disappear altogether as corporations begin to absorb CSR into all aspects of their business and make it a part of every employee’s responsibilities. As companies begin to assess and measure the effects their CSR programs have on the business’s reputation, CSR may increase in both scope and importance. Based on the interviews conducted, some CSR practitioners said they believe CSR should not be its own function or department but rather an integrated part of the business … Senior executives should pay more attention to the views of their external stakeholders when developing CSR strategies because their sentiments will affect the company’s reputation and/or its position among competitors.

The study found businesses need to look at CSR as a growing function. CSR strategies should be integrated into all areas of business.

In a world where the media is full of stories of corruption, best practices will continue to resonate.

Loudly.

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Find the study by request.

Find more on reputation and CSR/sustainability here:

The hydra upon you: Hype and its dangers for public relations and marketing

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Today’s post is a continuation of Silos, silly season, social.

The many-headed hydra and key messages

If you believe in dialogue, if you believe in the multiple digital channels that can help convey key messages, then you know the potential for communications. Still, there’s been so much noise during the iPhone 5 announcement, you might wonder why the heavens haven’t opened up and why we aren’t being visited by angels of innovation blessing all things with an “i” before them.

Never mind that sales are being reported as a disappointment.

In the post-Facebook IPO era, best practices, truth and open communication should be reinforced as the way to communicate. Sustainability as a strategy looms large.

Hype is a many-headed hydra. When all the hydra’s heads are talking at once, which one will consumers believe? What are the key messages? Is it just confusion?

Do target audiences believe they have a part in the conversation, or is it just the heads of the hydra talking to themselves?

Just as I’m writing this, a connection of mine, Mark D’Cunha posted this on LinkedIn:

Ears that do not listen to advice, accompany the head when it is chopped off.

— African proverb

Media is a wonderful creator, but what it creates, it can take away.

Satire and blowback:

Reputational damage is best avoided in the first place

When people start satirizing a brand en masse, what does it say about a brand’s future business potential?

Some outcomes are beyond even the most careful planners’ control.

The blowback from the Facebook IPO resulted in a ton of reputational damage, left many who talked about Facebook’s short-term growth potential looking a little ridiculous while reinforcing the long-term thinking of those who understand what P/E ratio means.

Companies have bottom lines. Attenion has to be paid to profitability.

Still, attention also has to be paid to whether a brand can wear out its welcome. How much is too much?

informal
Definition of hype

noun

[mass noun]

  • extravagant or intensive publicity or promotion: his first album hit the stores amid a storm of hype
  • [count noun] a deception carried out for the sake of publicity: is his comeback a hype?

verb

[with object]

  • promote or publicize (a product or idea) intensively, often exaggerating its benefits: an industry quick to hype its products they were hyping up a new anti-poverty idea

Origin:

1920s (originally US in the sense ‘short-change, cheat’, or ‘person who cheats etc.’): of unknown origin

Credit: Oxford online dictionary

IPO gaga and the misvaluations from Mars

If you’ve followed what’s happened to the Facebook brand since IPO, you’ve more than a clue about what could happen in a less-than-best-practices environment. From a risk mitigation point of view, when the crowd’s gone gaga, there’s definitely potential but also a proportionate increase in exposure.

What happens with Facebook is still unwritten. What’s sure is that amidst the feeding frenzy of negative news post-IPO, there were also stories working hard to portray potential, still. If public relations around the Facebook IPO had been conducted differently, less energy would’ve had to be directed toward rehabilitating the Facebook brand.

Facebook isn’t the first nor will it be the last to suffer from its own success. When hype goes out-of-control, it ceases to be good public relations, good marketing. Because target audiences are left with the feeling of being had.

This is sort of like a salesperson thinking of her potential clients as “marks”. Maybe the naming of things creates destiny. Clients are people.

Growth: The greatest investment the world ever knew was the investment in you

Audiences are made up of individuals. When they get together, they have awesome power. It doesn’t matter if they’re internal or external.

If you invest in treating people like smart human beings, they’ll invest in you.

I’ll be continuing posts on Silos, silly season and social. I’d like to share them with you.

Customers continue to fuel business case for sustainability and leaders are saying they get it

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Sometimes the simplest solutions are the most sustainable:

Helping businesses compete responsibly

Managements get it

Half do, according to a recent study:

MIT found 53 per cent of managements surveyed said sustainability initiatives have helped their companies profit.

With the wind of change at their backs, leaders changed their business model.

Policy and politcal pressure

The MIT study found that legislative or political pressure also plays a big role: 34 per cent of respondents citing the law or policy initiatives as affecting their ideas about sustainability.

People want sustainability built into an organization’s thinking.  They like the idea of sustainable products.

Two of the top three reasons leaders cite as being reasons for changing their business is the value proposition that is sustainability.

The art of listening

The automotive industry and the energy and utilities sector, often criticized for not being green enough,  finished first and second in making a business case for sustainability. Both industries were over 40 per cent.

Lagging

But technology and communications and the financial services sector scored low at 27 and 21 per cent respectively. These sectors have potential. If they’re behind, there’s opportunity for smart businesses in tech, communications and financial services to take the lead where competitors are lagging.

Publics are hard to ignore

Even companies like Apple, challenged regarding their supply chain, have invested in sustainability. The creation of their solar farm in Maiden, NC, (under pressure from environmental critics?) gives the company a positive. But Apple was recently hit with another bomb regarding its supply chain. Because of the company’s enormous cash horde, critics are unsympathetic, feeling Apple could do more.

Studies show the advantage of brands differentiating themselves through sustainable thinking.

If consumers and legislators are demanding more sustainability planning from companies, and businesses that haven’t been viewed as green traditionally are committing themselves to sustainability, can other companies afford to miss out on the potential value add?

The edge in keeping consumers happy

It seems like the pressure from consumers is something thoughtful managements have foremost in their minds.

As public relations and marketing find themselves increasingly challenged by astronomical growth in channels and tools, the obvious answer points to embracing sustainability and CSR as a strategy: Managements themselves say sustainability adds value.

Sometimes the simplest solutions are the most sustainable.

Silos, silly season, social: Inflating or informing the target audience?

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Open, honest, sustainable communications in multiple universes

The target audience is expanding as fast as the digital universe.

In one and two posts, I touched on how the target audience is vast and how writing and strategizing for those audiences is changing.

Abandon good journalistic practices and you’re bound to upset someone: Even just stating an opinion.

What’s your strategy? How many groups do you want to appeal to?

Beware someone doesn’t put a new frame around the picture you’re trying to paint

But how will you stop them? Better yet, you shouldn’t be trying to stop them. You should be encouraging the discussion by representing your organization, company, etc., yet you have to consider that those voices are really allies. The target audiences that don’t agree with your philosophy aren’t enemies. They are the best feedback money can buy. Together, you’ll communicate better.

Listen. Learn. Offer your messages.

In a recent post, I blogged about how Kelly Heinrich reframed and tactically subverted Apple’s Siri ads to advance her own cause. Fair game. She’s speaking for her organization and about a tool she uses, and how she feels about what may have gone into that tool.

In the post-Facebook IPO era, best practices are more important than ever. When you read media that gush with nothing but too-good-to-be-true positives, you might wonder:

Now, what inspired this piece?

Don’t do the disservice of thinking of your target audience as if they were “sheeple”. They’re not.

Audiences are alternate and expanding universes in themselves. Ever-changing. Ever-moving. They are chaos-out-of-order and order-out-of-chaos. The ultimate shape shifters … and I mean this in a complimentary way.

When audiences start feeling suspicious about what they’re reading or hearing, damage ensues.

The iSky’s the limit

Right now, there is rampant speculation on how many iPhones Apple will sell first week despite a delay in availability. The avalanche of information is often highly speculative. There’s a fair share of Apple criticism going on, too — especially, at the time of writing, on Google+, much of it centring on innovation, litigation and old-fashioned satire.

The media’s full of talk. But there’s less talk about how many hedge fund managers are in and out of Apple stock and other variables. The momentum may continue. Then again, now that my dog has an iPhone, you have to wonder how many bones the market can bare.

Humour aside … (I have no dog).

When we are heavily vested in something, does it make our thought processes clearer? The momentum may continue.

But for how long? How many stories do you remember that never end? The markets can be a collection of short stories.  What everyone aspires to is the collection of stories, or the novel that can sustain the reader (investor, stakeholder).

Ask Warren Buffett. When it comes to long-term track records, long-term thinking and valuation, very few can trade demonstrated philosophies with Buffett.

More suprising? … Buffett wonders why more don’t live his own philosophy.

The short-term hype machine and the damage done

When you talk about the kind of hype Facebook and Apple (have) generate(ed) at times, you really have to think about the variety of audiences, how that hype might be interpreted in the future, how some audiences might take issue.

How some audiences might become active.

Amongst all the noise, are critics starting to look more interesting and is Apple itself looking less interesting?

When hype gets to a volume so loud that there’s barely room to hear all the different voices pushing positive news, some begin to wonder if the creative thought process has died. Never make a promise you can’t keep. The problem is, as hype sets in, sometimes those you wanted to recruit as influencers will make the promises you can’t keep for you.

Promise something to the digital universe and you better deliver.

Deal with the world the way it is, not the way you wish it was.

— John Chambers

Silos, silly season and social continued:

The hydra upon you: Hype and its dangers for public relations and marketing

Heavy is the crown: Is Apple its own worst enemy?

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Reputational blowback?: Apple’s litigation strategy affects its own brand and reputation

Samsung brand on the upswing

Polling by YouGov shows that Samsung has already recovered from the recent Apple v. Samsung verdict. Actually, Samsung’s “buzz score” rating has surpassed Apple’s.

Sustainability and reputation issues are dogging Apple.  Many took to Facebook and Twitter to fling abuse at the company, some saying that the brand had become everything it had once stood against.

Have you “heard anything about the brand in the last two weeks, through advertising, news or by word of mouth,” asked YouGov. The company then assigned a score depending on responses positive or negative.

YouGov’s charts are clear evidence that Samsung’s brand has risen and Apple’s has fallen.

It’s hard to gauge what effect this will have long-term, especially considering the momentum Apple has behind it, but it’s clear that its brand has taken a beating. In an August 28th post, Siri, What’s “sustainability”?, I asked questions about Apple’s strategy: Specifically, that they don’t seem to be speaking to the broader audience that now is focused, like a laser, on Apple.

On September 6th, Forbes wrote about Apple’s dive suggesting Apple’s secret talks with Google might have been strongly motivated by the reputational blowback from Apple v. Samsung, which is looking more and more like a strategic mistake.

Clearly, Apple’s campaign of aggressive litigation added to consumer’s concerns: Not to mention the sustainability of their supply chain. But is Apple listening?

Is the pattern of immense hype (hype that may have slipped out of their control) generated by Apple in the media going to increase the volume of blowback? Is Apple at or close to its zenith in profitability, or, from an investor’s point of view, the ascendency of its stock price?

Credit: Forbes

“Apple has turned into the exact product they were against in the 1984 Super Bowl Ad.”

— Twitter user

Meet the new boss. More litigious than the old boss?

Sentiment against Apple was overwhelmingly negative post-verdict. Some have seen this coming for a long time. The hype is so extreme right now as the iPhone 5 is released that it’s impossible to know what the fallout from Apple’s own self-induced reputational damage will be.

Tech consumers change their minds in what looks to a long-term investor the blink-of-an-eye. The media, while generating an immense amount of hype is also giving birth to stories that portray Apple as Goliath, a big bully, unfeeling, unthinking and a poor listener.

Apple has followed a pattern of knowing it’s right when it comes to business strategy. So far, that strategy’s worked very well, but what leadership should consider is gravity.

The weight

The gravitas of investor and consumer sentiment accumulates and acts like a social David. And we all remember what David did to Goliath. In fact, didn’t Apple base its marketing strategy on being the “little guy” taking on Goliath?

Now, David pulls back his digital sling of zeroes and ones. Take a look at how Apple’s been trending on Google+, (at the time of writing).

There’s also the fact that it looks like both HTC and Samsung will sue Apple over LTE and try to block the iPhone 5. He who lives to litigate dies by litigation?

Meanwhile, HBR points out that Google’s spending on R&D, despite what many may think, dwarfs Apple’s as a percentage of revenue. Perhaps Apple’s just giving the people what they want: Perception of innovation over actual percentage of dollars spent on innovation.

If word-of-mouth is the greatest form of marketing, the social cybersphere is talking loudly, it’s consumer-generated (though more research is needed on these consumers), and it seems to be sounding off against what it perceives to be a heavy distortion field placed over the marketplace. Perception is reality.

Regardless, satirizing Apple has become a popular sport. When will their be an app for that?

If the new standard for the anti-Apple forces is: “Innovate don’t litigate”, then Apple in pursuing an aggressive strategy of litigation may have undone some of the reputational capital it’s worked years to build. Heavy is the crown.

But also, heavy is the hype. Apple may be going down a different yet parallel road that Facebook knows all-to-well. There’s a fine line between exceptional marketing and public relations and creating the Frankenstein monster.

Still, there’s a lot of momentum for Apple. But we’ve learned that out-of-control hype can be a double-edged sword. We’ve also learned that when stock performance doesn’t meet the enormity of expectation the decline can be huge.

Facebook’s decline of 50 per cent was pretty much as large as that of BP. And Facebook didn’t leak any oil.

Still, Apple has concrete numbers.

Does Apple Marketing and Public Relations feel ecstatic about a brand that convinces people old is new (see Jimmy Kimmel)? Does this soaring rocket of hype escape Earth’s atmosphere or like Facebook fall back held by the force of gravity?

Maybe the question is simply:

Is Apple its own worst enemy?

Jimmy Kimmel Confirms People Love the New iPhone 5, Even Though They’re Being Pranked With an iPhone 4S

Apple releases iNothing  – Video

Siri, What’s “sustainability”?

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“Man is the creator of change in this world.” — Steve Jobs

How will Apple speak to its growing audiences, sustainability issues and public perception?

Just sustain it

Define “change”.

Admit it.

Sometimes, you just scan the headlines, right? And they impact on you, right?

Take a look at this one:

Siri, Do You Use Slaves?

Would you want this headline related to your product? Even if you are the biggest company in the world by market cap — or maybe, especially because you are.

Heinrich’s headline (it’s a link) made very clever use of John Stewart and The Daily Show. As Apple’s market cap has grown, so has the target placed on its brand.

And why not? Didn’t Apple make its marketing focus Microsoft (the market cap leader at the time) for years? When you become the biggest company by market cap in history right now (see below article), you have to expect this.

(By the way, The Daily Show’s taken on Apple before.)

Heinrich understood how to reframe Apple advertising well. She used a guerrilla headline to attract attention to her cause.

Expanding. Digital. Universe. There are a lot of target audiences out there.

Apple’s stepped away from greening its brand. It’s supply chain has been held up as wanting.

It doesn’t matter if Apple’s competitors are using the same supply chain (some aren’t and others are paying a lot more attention to sustainability issues.) As concerns over its closed system, sustainability, patents, etc., increase regarding the Apple brand, it’s likely we’ll see more media stories, more anti-Apple posts, challenging, satirizing or taking a negative position on Apple.

Right now, it’s hype season. The iPhone 5’s coming out. Biggest market cap in history a few days ago — ok, so that wasn’t correct, but …

When you become the biggest corporation, you’d better consider the competitive threats. Big market cap means big target audiences. Audiences have opinions.

Remember BP? Remember “Beyond Petroleum”?

When BP CEO Tony Hayward began massive cost-cutting at BP, it’s focus on sustainability went out the window. What happened in 2010 with the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill will go down in history as one of the greatest of environmental disasters.

The disaster is now synonymous with the BP brand and a 50 per cent drop in stock price. It could have been avoided with proper risk mitigation. Sustainability leads to risk mitigation.

While Apple doesn’t face the same obvious dangers to its business that the oil industry does, it’s decision-making processes regarding sustainability may be moving in the same direction as BP. They’ve both spent a lot of time and resources in court.

Is innovation better done in the lab or in court?

Above image sent out on Twitter in response to Apple v. Samsung

iPhones have supply chain and waste issues, don’t they?

The big time: Siri, What’s “market cap”?

Audiences have opinions. Apple worked a philosophy that countered Microsoft’s, but Apple’s history isn’t going to fade away. It’s going to be subverted and used against the Apple brand. Apple doesn’t exist in a vacuum.

It’s made the big time.

Apple is awash in cash. It’s sheer size makes the company’s margins and business seem unsustainable. Doesn’t it make sense that Apple would move more toward sustainability? That it would want to improve its image from a sustainability/CSR perspective?

Isn’t that what leaders do?

Or do they litigate endlessly?

Sent by user on Twitter under #boycottApple

How does such litigation reflect on brand?

Apple has almost $117 billion in cash. Exactly the reason why people like John Stewart are taking on Apple. It’s not the “little guy”.

It’s a behemoth.

Like it or not, when you’re the biggest company in the world, stakeholders expect accountability. They expect a leader. Not just in innovation. Not just the “cool” of the product you’re creating.

But a leader in best practices, too. Across the board.

And “browning” your brand isn’t that cool. Especially when you spend cash litigating aggressively.

Stakeholders want what’s open and honest.

While Apple v. Samsung wasn’t related to Apple’s de-greening, it shows how aggressive audiences embrace issues and attack a brand accusing it of “brandwashing”.

What of a company’s own employees?

… organizations should maintain their commitments to
customers, the environment, human rights and
communities or risk significant decreases in
employees’ perceptions of their organization’s CSR
commitment …

Leaders?

Business leaders ranked the top three benefits of investing in or pursuing socially and environmentally responsible
practices as follows:

  • Positive organizational reputation;
  • Higher or sustained employee engagement; and
  • Eliminate/reduce impact on the environment.

Does momentum last forever for the largest company by market cap? Not usually.

Global research conducted by Hewitt revealed that organizations with high engagement generated total shareholder returns that were 29% above average.

Above quotations from:

CSR as a Driver of Employee Engagement — Hewitt

As Costco CFO Richard Galanti has said about CSR:

It’s not about applying to the ‘beauty contest’.

Sure it’s about great products and profits, but it’s also about a corporate vision of a sustainable future — a sticky, feel-good sensation that stands for something beyond profit. It’s about who you are as a corporate citizen. About what your vision is for humankind.

After all, isn’t “man the creator of change in this world”?

With great power comes great responsibility.

— Stan Lee (creator of Spiderman)

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